Piscatorial Pictorials: Paintings of Fish by , Yuji Kanamaru, Annabelle Marquis, Aries Wu, Spencer Lau & Camille Henrot

Let’s see how four different artists capture the same subject—fish—in their paintings:

1. Yuji Kanamaru (Whitestone Gallery)

Visitor From the Past : Pirarucu by Yuji Kanamaru
Title: Visitor From the Past – Pirarucu (Detail View); Artist Yuji Kanamaru; Mixed media on board; Art Central (Whitestone Gallery). Photo by longzijun.

Yuji Kanamaru’s art focuses on animals and buildings—with fish and elephants being popular subjects. The type of fish in the painting is a pirarucu (also known as arapaima), a very large fish that can grow to up to three metres in length and can weigh up to 150 kilograms. It is native to the Amazon and is one of the largest freshwater fishes in the world. Fossils very similar to this fish have been found that date back to the middle of the Miocene period, making this fish, as the title of the painting states, a visitor from the past.

Title: Visitor From the Past - Pirarucu (Detail View); Artist Yuji Kanamaru; Mixed media on board; Art Central (Whitestone Gallery). Photo by longzijun.
Title: Visitor From the Past – Pirarucu (Detail View); Artist Yuji Kanamaru; Mixed media on board; Art Central (Whitestone Gallery). Photo by longzijun.

This detail view of the painting shows how the artist uses blotchy brushstrokes, lack of perspective, grid-like lines, earthy colors and swatches of different kinds of canvas to give his paintings an aged, ancient feel and an appearance that seems part patchwork fabric, part map and part illustration.
 

2. Annabelle Marquis (Arteria Gallery)

Newcalypso by Annabelle Marquis;
Artist: Annabelle Marquis; Title: Newcalpyso; Acrylic and collage on canvas; Affordable Art Fair (Arteria Gallery). Photo by longzijun

Like Yuji Kanamaru, Montreal-based artist Annabelle Marquis combines paint (in this case acrylics) and other materials to create a kind of collage. The effect, however, is quite different. In Yuji Kanamaru’s works the combination of fabric and paint creates a rustic, patchwork feel, while in the paintings of Annabelle Marquis, the paint and materials are blended together to create a shimmery, more vibrant feel. You can see her technique in the following video:

You can fnd out more at the artist’s website: annabellemarquis.com
 

3. Aries Wu (Aries Art Studio)

– Click on each image to see a higher resolution
version (2048 x 1365) on Flickr –

Artist: Aries Wu (Aries Art Studio); Fotanian (2014). Photo by longzijun.
Artist: Aries Wu (Aries Art Studio); Fotanian (2014). Photo by longzijun.

Aries (胡浚諺) is a young Hong Kong artist who focuses on realistic paintings and sketches of everyday objects, his work drawing the viewers’attention to the visual poetry of the world around them (artist’s website: aries-art-studio.com). In Hong Kong, steamed or fried whole fish is a common dish at dinner. In this painting, two silver and black colors and curved lines of the two fish contrast with the grid of white tiles of a typical Hong Kong kitchen counter .
 

4. Spencer Luk (1816 Studio)

Untitled (2013) by Spencer Luk (1816 Studio); Fotanian 2014. Photo by longzijun.
Untitled (2013) by Spencer Luk (1816 Studio); Fotanian 2014. Photo by longzijun.

Visiting Spencer Luk’s (Luk Ho-sun) studio during the Fotanian open day, I was struck by the wide range of styles and media on display. His work ranges from realistic life drawings to cartoon-like figures of commuters to more abstract paintings like Untitled (shown above). Even in his abstract work, the inspiration can be seen bubbling up towards the surface. In Untitled, for example, the colors, sense of movement and light are based on swimming goldfish.

The photos of the paintings of Spencer Luk and Aries Wu were taken at Fotanian (www.fotanian.org), a weekend art festival when artists in the industrial district of Fotan in Hong Kong open their doors to the public.
 

5. Camille Henrot (Metro Pictures)

Artist: Camille Henrot; Title: Study for Big Fish Small Fish (2015); Watercolor on paper; Art Basel Hong Kong (Gallery: Metro Pictures). Photo by longzijun.
Artist: Camille Henrot; Title: Study for Big Fish Small Fish (2015); Watercolor on paper; Art Basel Hong Kong (Gallery: Metro Pictures). Photo by longzijun.

You can view the painting that this is a study for in this article: Time Out: Camille Henrot. The painting is from a series of simple, almost-cartoonish watercolors meant to show inequity and injustice in mythology and modern life.


~by (longzijun)

artjouer

Return to Artjouer’s Gallery of Artists

 

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